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league in europe. combined with steadily rising television rights, they have made a solid foundation for german soccer. the only thing missing is that elusive european title. >> we hope they get it. if you are just joining us, you are watching the "journal" coming to you from dw in berlin. after a short break, we will take a look of the role of german chancellor angela merkel in solving the eurozone debt crisis. >> we will be right back. do not go away. >> welcome back. >> 2012 is coming to an end, and a lot of people in europe will be happy to see the old year out. not a day went by without worrying about the future of europe. >> not just for finance experts. a to was also a tough year for political leaders as they lurch from one crisis summit to another, spending -- spending long as wrangling over the best strategy to solve europe cozy financial crisis. >> as europe's biggest economy, germany naturally had a large say. >> as germany's leader, angela merkel naturally made sure her voice was heard. >> she's the most powerful woman in europe. all eyes were on chancellor and to merkel
. europe right now is the safe haven. there's no negative news. by any means, they are not done with all that's going on over there. everything is focused here on the u.s. and the fiscal cliff, and until that is resolved, if it gets resolved, the traders are pulling back, volatility's high, and there's going to be very thin volume in the markets. it's not going to take much to get gold and silver back up. >> well, back to cindy quickly. if we have a deal, is it bullish for oil? she's already gone. i'll ask doreen, you're with us, aren't you? >> i am. volume, today, by the way, 37% below the three month average. could lead to some volatility, but we have not seen that, have we? >> we have not, but vix is up at 19, a little bit higher. the hope is to get more volume here, otherwise, you know, the fiscal cliff is killing everything. everything. these guys don't get it in washington. i don't know why. i hope they come to their senses soon. ashley: nobody knows why, but i'm tired of saying "fiscal cliff," i know that. thank you so much for joining us. >> thank you. >> and cindy who ran off. t
let between innovators coming from central europe and those coming from the plateau which has fostered a suspicious negotiation and character they can see right of into the politics in bucharest to this day and i can go to every country, not every but many countries and talk about but. >> talk for a moment about germany. one of the images germany has natural boundaries to the north and south with the alps and further burden the east and the west is flat plains, so germany had a war over the century with germany or france or that area and poland and because germany was a continental power sandwiched between the maritime europe on one hand and the heartland towards the other it was always problematic which we it would go and how it would develop. i can across this book by accident in early 1989. the berlin fall with -- berlin wall would fall but november. it had occurred to me after reading this book and other books that the berlin wall or the dividing line between eastern and western germany was one. creation of german history that would reinvested soften different territory always in t
't accurate because of the things in europe or something involved with the election. in other words, other than those shorting or going long stocks ahead of the quarter, these earnings reports need a context to make you money. they can't be relied upon any more because they aren't as predictive of future behavior as they once were. they are a piece of the puzzle. a part of the mosaic. but they are only one of many important parts of what predicts where our stock will go over the intermediate term. and that tends to be the focus that i teach on the show. it is a teaching show because i want you to know the metrics i'm using to pick stocks i talk about and recommend here. and with my travel trust which you can follow along. i also want to teach you how to listen to these conference calls, listen to the transcripts. at least give economy opini-- g you my opinion and what i think matter. i hope this show once and for all -- because this is what i see on twitter constantly -- use earnings season as a way to evaluate your portfolio, what to trim, what you need more of. hone your way of thinking.
in the overall market because of europe or something involved in the election. in other words, other than for those who are shorting or going long stocks ahead of the quarter, these earnings reports need a context to make you money. they can't be relied upon anymore because they aren't as predictive of future behavior as they once were. they are a piece of the puzzle. a part of the mosaic. but they are only one of many important parts that predicts where a stock will go over the interyacht term. that tends to be the focus that i teach on the show. and it is a teaching show. because i want you to know the metrics i'm using to pick stocks i talk about and recommend here. and pick for my charitable trust, actionalertsplus.com. i want to teach how you to listen to these calls and read the transcripts. i'm hoping this show will once and for all, because this is what i see at jim cramer on twitter constantly tell you how to evaluate your portfolio, figure out what you need to trim, what you need more of. let it help your stock selection hone your wave thinking. not mine. yours. earnings season
carry three times that amount. it is part of russia's plan to reduce its reliance on europe, which currently buys about 87% of the country's oil exports. during price talks with europe, russia has also -- often said it would seek other buyers and focus more on asian buyers. >> china's biggest producer of so-called rare earths has suspended output at some of its plants for another month as part of an effort to push up prices. >> rare earths are a group of elements crucial for making high-tech gadgets like smartphones and ipads, and they're mostly found in china, giving producers a handle on the market. and despite that, prices are falling. >> rare earths are, in china, but many minds in mongolia have fallen silent. state media says that will not change or at least another month. the country's biggest roberts player is trying to stop falling prices. as the world's biggest rare earths supplier, has plenty of power on the market. chinese companies -- of 97% of the global share of rare earths. the u.s. share is much smaller by comparison, as is russia's. rare earths prices have been div
deadlocked on how to resolve this crisis. noticed it, europe and arab nations are calling on a side to step down, loo but russia, chind iran continue to back assab. it states may well lose his status as the world's sole superpower by 2030. according to new report from the nationalst intelligence council. the united states to the obama intelligence rports suggestt wo will be first among equals as asia set to surpass north america and europe combined in terms of global power. joining us now to talk about implications for the foreign policy and wha in what is happen the middle east, john negroponte, the first director of national intelligence appointed by george w. bush serving five times as an investor and in his distinguished career in intelligence and diplomacy. great to have you with us. >> thank you. lou: let's start with the middle east. president morsi, ordering the military to arrest civilians. what is your reaction? >> i just think it is administration of the precariousness of the situation in egypt, but that situation is critical. we can't afford to see egypt go over some kind of a b
and europe. the country boasts more than a 20% share in the global medical capsule market. mitsubishi chemical representatives said the medical capsule business has a potential for stable growth. they added the company will continue to expand in the medical and health sectors. that's the latest in business. here's a recap of market figures. ♪ ♪ >>> japan's liberal democratic party leader shinzo abe will form his new government today. abe led his party to a landslide victory in the recent general election. a special diet session will be convened on wednesday afternoon to choose the successor to outgoing prime minister yoshihiko noda. abe will be elected prime minister by voting in the upper and lower houses. he will be the first japanese prime minister in 64 years to be given a second chance. abe was prime minister for one year until he resigned in september 2007. abe plans to immediately start forming his cabinet. he'll hold a news conference in the evening to lay out his government's visions. the new government is not short on challenges. one urgent task is restoring the country'
in vienna. it is europe's seconds oldest, founded in the early 18th century. keller is the youngest master painter but she has traveled to ishikawa preif he can hurricane is the home of kit tanny-style porcelain, to learn how it's painted. >> there are some differences and it's very interesting to learn and to see and to get more inspiration for working at home. >> reporter: keller's first stop is the workshop of the popular kit tanny ware pay thor busan fukushima. here she can take a close look at his elaborate brush work surrounding the ceramics. keller was surprised that even for fine lines, kit tanny artists use brushes, the austrians use a kind ofani arti use brushes, the austrians use a kind of metallic pen. >> reporter: next, keller was shown how to use pigment the kitani way. they use special pigments to make the five primary colors like red, blund yellow. for example, they mix the pigment with metal or glass. after firing, the color changes critically. this does not happen with austrian pigments. >> and what is this color? >> reporter: now keller gets down to work. after the basic
collapse. any time you go to europe, i love europe. i'm not going to talk about the chocolate makers, but when you go to europe and especially great britain, you don't get the sense of optimism you don't get when you land back here in america. i heard you talk about the force multiplier. you multiply that 300 million times over, what a powerful force. >> i spend a lot of time out in the countryside talking to all kinds of audiences. trade associations and financial organizations and they are all worried about the economy and the unemployment rate. they haven't lost confidence. they are hustling and trying to make a living so that people make a better living for their families. don't count this place out. it will never be out. >> the second rule runs counter to what the reality is in washington right now. get mad and then get over it. you talked about how politics is not a zero sum game. your friend 90% of the time is not your enemy 10% of the time. >> i tell a story about a disagreement i had back in 2003 over the iraq war. france was against us going to war and we were against franc
of the army? >> they are roughly 123,000 total. but pago is roughly the size of western europe. there are about 6000 deployed. no, that is the minusco, 6000 deployed in the east purdum i do not know the exact number of the congolese military in the east because it is a vast amount of area they are trying to cover with military troops. >> why is this such a big issue for the drc in order to be able to basically prevail in this situation? >> a slight provision -- revision. i think probably today, the m23 probably has up to 2000 troops. the sign -- i think he has pointed out the size of the congo, but i think it is important to graphically described the congo as a country that is as large as the eastern part of the united states from the atlantic to the mississippi. it is an enormous country, and since the split of sudan, it is geographically the largest in africa. the eastern congo is one of the most of a cold areas in which to operate -- one of the most difficult areas in which to operate. it is deeply for arrested in some places. and in -- is deeply forested. in some cases, a d
of the former brish colonies. in europe the dax down about there about 35 points, around half a percent. and overnight in japan, the nikkei, the yen falling to a 20-month low. you have the nikkei up 1.5%. the nikkei -- yen versus the dollar as shinzo abe returns to office as japan's new prime minister, promising monetary and fiscal reforms. we have the shanghai composite there up about a quarter percent. >>> all right. in today's top stories, the u.s. is five days away from going over the fiscal cliff. president obama is cutting his holiday vacation short, returning to washington tomorrow to continue talks to try to avoid that automatic tax hike and spending cut combination. that's the same day that congress returns to town. before the president left town on friday, he suggested a stopgap measure to freeze tax rates for people making less than $250,000 a year and extend unemployment benefits. reports say white house staffers have been quietly working with senate democrats to come up with a plan to avoid the fiscal cliff, but little progress has been made. >>> a chinese ratings agency is
school of notre dame was influential. we know it innewsed music across europe, spain and italy. >> but you have no idea how delighted quazi moto was. the bell told to mark the hours of the day as it told to mark the liberation of the city in 1944. >> in front of notre dame and even in one of the towers of the famous cathedral, the nazis have established fire. >> we traveled west of paris to normandy to this village, to one of three bell foundrys still in operation. here they are casting the eight new bells to hang in the to your. >> the original bells were seized during the revolution and melted to cannon balls. they are recasting them in copper and continue using molds fashioned from horse hair and ma nuria. >> as we don't want them to make them twice, we will make them higher in tune. and we will take the met a aloff inside to get it perfectly calibrated. >> once tuned, they will toll for the first time in march on palm sunday. right now it is the christmas nativity scene that draws the crowds with two million people expected in december. always an attraction. though it's the
think there is a lot of optimism - even in europe there's a lot of optimism, but we know how that all goes when there is a lot of optimism. so, anyway, slow trading expected this week. > will there be some last- minute adjustments, or have most of those folks already gone home and closed the books for the year? > > i think for the most part anyone that really had anything to do really has done it already. that would be the capital gains tax-type selling, that sort of thing. but there's always some minor window dressing issues that could come up. so i wouldn't really pay much attention to the price action this week. what is probably more important is the first couple weeks in january. > do you have any kind of end- of-the-year strategy here, or are you just kind of going sit on your hands? > > at this point, no. just wait 'til next year and start fresh. > no plan is a good plan. it's good to have you on the show this morning. take care. > > thanks angela. in our cover story, workers making the minimum will make a little more in ten states beginning january first. and each of those incr
all over europe. >> yeah, right. >> if she's looking for her next destination, where should she go in europe? >> by train. that's what you do. >> you can sleep on it it's your hotel room for the night. >> it is but by december 31st book this deal. you get a global pass on eurail and it gives you access to 23 separate countries. you can sleep through all of them. >> you don't have to sleep through the country, but on your way to the country. >> exactly. >> skip a night paying for the hotel. two hotel deals. >> first, hilton worldwide, 40% off on weekend stays, that's across all their brands, and the best deal of all is right here in new york you've heard of restaurant week we call the dead week. they are not calling it hotel week from january 4th to the 20th. 26 different hotels here in new york offering deals as low as $100 a night versus $500 and up from that period of time from january 4th to the 20th you cannot beat that. >> i want to travel. >> i love traveling, although thinking about the train, i was once on an overnight train in europe, it literally shu
in all over north america and europe and africa and really we have got wishes coming in from almost every country in the world now. and people are just expressing, all kinds of amazing hopes and dreams for the future of the world which is really encouraging for us. we create the tree as a symbol of the global unity and hope. and we are going to continue to add wishes to the tree all through the month of december. so we would love for you to go to our website which is rainbow fund.org and it is free and we will printout your wish on a piece of paper and fold it into a crane and put it up on the tree. now, i want to thank, some key people who helped with this year's tree. first i want to start off with our core team, our core creative team and that consists of karin kai and linda mihara and thank you they have been working on the tree for seven years. >> and this year we have the help of dozens of volunteers and i want to particularly acknowledge the university of berkeley alfa, fi omega service community and volunteers from one brick. aid for good, the san francisco chapter. and you guys a
and ongoing problems in europe. the market has done better than it has usual done. what's changed? i think there will be continued political turmoil and slow growth but that's, particularly given valuations, may not be a bad year for equities as all. >> i'm going to add to that list having been a good year for the stock market. also had a lot of recovery in the housing market as well. do all these good things, all this progress become undone if we go over the fiscal cliff. >> i think clearly we've seen some healing in housing which is great and as has already been said we've seen some good progress over in europe and in china so that's all great. i'm neutral on equities in my allocation strategy fund, target rich funds and the reason for that is the fiscal cliff. if we go over the fiscal cliff then i think that given how lean companies are, and as slow as we're growing, we could see the economy dip back into recession and earnings estimates will have to go lower. >> the mastercard report on retail sales not good. the worst since '08, and you're concerned -- obviously there are those who fe
to talk to them. now, law in europe is undergraduate. very few countries in the world have a graduate law school. but england, europe, undergraduate. so these orientation students were basically high school seniors ready to enter the freshman year of college. and so i talked with them. maybe 80 people are i said i'm just a scared he to tell you about the supreme court. and we started talking, and a student raised her hand, and she said, now checks and balances is very important in your constitution and the present checks -- who protects, who checks the coats? good question. not sure i had a satisfactory answer. [laughter] there is an answer. and another student raised his hand, and he said federalism is very important in america. but money goes to washington, and then it goes to the states with conditions. with grants and eight. doesn't this undermine federalism? in a student raised her hand and said now, chief justice john marshall was very much admired in the united states. for all his decisions popular when he wrote them? i said wait, stop. [laughter] i said, you knew i was coming. you
. nowhere in europe had he experienced that. this technology was doing something to support the life and the growth of the city. philadelphia, throughout the 19th century, was the major industrial city of the united states. all of these industries used water from this system. and it served as a prototype for many american cities, including pittsburgh and new york. man: new york city went to philadelphia and said, "you know, we're thinking of developing a hudson river water supply -- what do you suggest we do?" and they said, "we've had "a lot of problems on the schuylkill. "don't go to the hudson river. go to the upland and work by gravity." and that's what new york city did. they first went to the hudson highlands, but 150 years later, it went to the delaware highlands. and really diverted the water that normally went to philadelphia to new york city. i don't think they anticipated that. narrator: the majority of new york city's drinking water comes from watersheds in upstate new york. a watershed is the area of land where water from rain or snow melt drains downhill into a body of
is their client. >> reporter: so far, only a few dozen have been sold in stores in europe and the u.s. but the orders keep coming in. even though there is some skepticism on the street. >> i think it's kind of creepy, actually. i don't like that idea at all. it just sort of seems a bit like big brother. >> that's weird. sick. >> especially if i was shopping in the underwear section. >> reporter: one high-end retailer in manhattan says it won't use the i.c., worried it may be an invasion of privacy. >> with the mannequin, i think it's even more frightening. it's almost as though -- remember that old movie "fx," somebody is watching you. so it's concerning. >> reporter: and in this economy, the last thing stores want to do is scare people away. >> if you're doing things the comfortable might not be comfortable with, you might have crossed the line. >> reporter: maybe if the mannequins were a little more human. >> yeah, i think that's a great idea. that way if you need something, you can ask them where it is. >> reporter: of course, there are actual real people already hired to do that
to ban gun laws that ban people from protecting themselves. all over europe there have been mass murders -- >> you're talking complete and utter -- >> people need to be able to defend themselves toe point of the crime and not for the police to come until after everybody's dead. >> what you said, mr. pratt, the gun deaths in australia and britain, they are 35 people killed a year. your country is 12,000. >> your murder rate is lower than hours, that is true. >> it's 35 against 12,000. >> your violent crime rate -- your violent crime rate is higher than ours, as is the violent crime rate in australia. america is not the wild west that you are depicting. we only have the problem in our cities and unhappily in our schools where people like you have been able to get laws put on the books that keep people from being able to defend themselves. i honestly don't understand why you would rather have people be victims of a crime than be able to defend themselves. it's incomprehensible. >> you're an unbelievably stupid man, aren't you? >> it seems to. he you're morally obtuse. you seem to be able to
and the world wars of the 20th century. my mother preferred the ancient world in 18th century europe. for them come in the past was not a tie and a welfare. but full of exciting people, rate heroes and heroines, and defense that could teach us a great deal about our own times. here at the library we decided to concentrate on making history of the kennedy administration accessible to the widest possible audience. in the hope that the treasures of the kennedy library will inspire people growing up today in the same way the stories of the past spired my parents. on the 50th anniversary of my father's inauguration, in january 2001, we launched the digital archive from putting all the presents papers and correspondence and memos and photograph and film online, so that people can have access online to this material. not just scholars who come to boston. we created the president's desk, an interactive tool, so that kids can experience most important moments of the presidency. and we translated my father's major addresses into 40 languages online. this is the culmination of digitizing and creating the
are growing in number. take a look at this. in the u.s. there are 100 groups. u.k., 200. europe, 500. what is going on? >> this is part of a growing global backlash against the wind industry. this is very successful rtraying itself as green. we produce green energy, green lech i very, reduce co2 emissions. when you look at countries around the world, australia, new zealand, huge backlash in ontio, we're seeing backlash against the large wind projects going in all over the place. gerri: talk about new york. you have an interesting example there. >> just last month lawyers here in new york filed lawsuits, 60 residents in herkimer county just north of albany, they filed a lawsuit saying these project, wind turbines, built within 1000 feet or so of residences are emitting all the noise, keeping them up at night, diminishing property values and they filed suit. i think it is indicative of the backlash. gerr this is interesting. you say this is the first time it will be heard in court of law, the issue about the sound. >> in the u.s., yes. gerri: seems to me that is pollution. >> sure it is. tha
? >> quite simply, europe looks so bad where would you put the money? alternative to --. lori: talking about that for a year now. there is no interest payment in u.s. bond. u.s. stocks are really a better return right now. >> well they are right now but if we go over the cliff you might not want to repeat that statement. cash might, a lot of people are going to have to move to cash if they really feel shaky about the u.s. government. but gold. we might see a boom in gold. lori: buy up that bullion. bury it in the backyard. real hard asset. >> just like french farmers. lori: no kidding. tracy: peter, you're great. have a happy new year. >> happy new year, friend. lori: i wasn't arguing with him. i was agreeing with him. tracy: you're question is a good one. where are the bond vigilantees? they have been gone for months now. lori: for years. tracy: for years, you're right, my goodness another housing bailout, the government backing up a plan to bail out underwater homeowners that may ultimately leave you on the hook. tracy: let's look how oil is trading as we head out to break. it is up almost
. >>> meantime, in europe markets are closed for the boxing day holiday. seems weird to do it just for a bunch of people to -- >> box up the gifts and return them. >> it's not a -- >> bad, i know. >> it is boxing. what kind of boxing are we -- boxer rebellion? >> i've never understood boxing day. >> we have to look it up. >> i literally have no idea. >> or it's on google. no, is there anything on google that is different? let me see. just a regular -- >> is there their our way to figure out what's going on in the world? >> yeah. google, whatever it has. as for the broader markets, let's take a quick look at oil. just been quiet. 89, sort of 85 to 90 for a while. yeah, google's back at its normal look today. the ten year at 1.777. the dollar which has been fun to watch, one of the areas where something's happening. euro back to $1.32. and it's been interesting to watch with the yen with all the comments coming out of it. and gold, i'm going to be right. i'm going to be right. didn't go -- look at that. like nowhere near 2000. that was -- i had to make the prediction last year. the gold, everybo
to watch things in europe. the big day is the september 11th elections in germany and germany could be harder after the election. in the first half is the sent ceiling discussion and finally profits, personal income and production, if those can do better than the markets can lift but right now the view is for a nothing market from here till year end. once the seasonal increases go away, we could have tax increases rand spending cuts if we get a deal. why is that going on a headwind for the stock market? >> i think it will be. if the taxes go up, i think that's something that hurts consumer confidence. you've seen the retail sales in the last part of this season here, have sold off, and many people have said it's because of the fiscal cliff. >> kind of depressing when you say it's a nothing market between now and the end of 2013. how do you make money, if you want to see it's going to be a -- >> he knows rhyme going to say buy apple. it's up 20%, up 50% and some off a little bit. if it sells off, you'll have nice dividend stocks like ant anti--sizer, the subplatform of all of the sma
and accomplished assassin and he had been recruited by the cia after clandestine meetings in europe and latin america. he told the cia he disposed fidel castro, turned against him and wanted to assassinate him and this was music to the years because they were under tremendous pressure from the kennedy administration especially bobby kennedy to get to the term to get rid of fidel castro. so he was recruited to the agency and he was trained in demolition in france by the cia officers, he was trained in the secret writing and he was their greatest hope to assassinate castro. >> he turned out to be a double agent. he was working for fidel castro all along. the cia did not know this. the kennedys did not notice pittard i approved this i think beyond a reasonable doubt. i have sources from the cuban intelligence that sought documents in havana that proved this and there are declassified cia documents that give me the added assurance that he was a double agent working for fidel. he knew there for not only that the cia was trying to kill castro, but that bobby kennedy and therefore jack kennedy or be
america as a place that had thrown off all of the old problems of europe and britain. you know, the social system and those kinds of things that dickens felt really got in the way of business. when he got here, he was idolized straight off the ship. he was invited out to dinner every night. huge banquets. he was not pretentious. he was many things but pretentiousness wasn't something that he ever displayed. >> so this is a picture of the two great victorian novelists, friends and rivals: tell me a little bit about it. >> what the caricaturist has tried to capture here most importantly is their social distinctions, their class difference. wearing top hats, the hats of the pa trishian class. dickens in the hat of the common man. of course what the caricaturist is pointing towards is the difference in their readership, the difference being dickens' much broader appeal to the reading public. also i found the bowler hit is a hint to his american audience as well. dickens was highly aware of how perilous his own life was in terms of the social circumstances that he grew up in. his father was imp
. but in recent years, japan, europe and the uk have all ended the practice, leaving the u.s. and gabon the only two nations that allow scientists to conduct tests on chimpanzees, but maybe not for long. >> if this committee had been tasked to do what it was asked to do five years from now, we probably would have said there is no longer any need for the use of chimpanzees. >> reporter: jeffrey kahn is a professor of bioethics at johns hopkins university. he chaired a blue ribbon committee for the institute of medicine that took a hard look chimpanzee testing in the u.s. as the outcry from animal rights activists reached a crescendo. >> we did acknowledge that from the perspective of this committee, the fact that chimpanzees are very close to humans gives them a different status. >> reporter: in late 2011, the committee laid out strict guidelines for chimp testing: the research must be done only when it's lifesaving, it can't be done ethically in humans, there are no other models, and the animals are socially and humanely housed. when the report arrived here at the national institutes of health,
of europe in 1848 was in flames about whether or not they were going to have democracies or monarchies. and the world didn't know yet whether or not democracy was simply another name for chaos. and the coherence of a people's government which is what he saying in the gettysburg address was an important thing to prove, not just that we could create a government of the people, but that it could endure a terrible test. and i think that he felt that to have the war end without slavery being eliminated -- >> once and for all, not just with the emancipation proclamation-- >> -- had once and for all, right. >> -- but by the constitution. >> right, and i think that you see how important that was to him and that he tried to and succeeded in getting the house to pass it, at the same to keep his party which was enormously, it's the like democratic party today, it's blue dog democrats, there were sort of blue dog republicans. half the republican party was conservative and weren't sure that they liked, they were anti-slavery but they believed in sort of gradual emancipation over they, thought that
, whether it be the fiscal cliff, the election, the situation in europe. nonetheless, gold has just not been the safe haven. this morning, it was industrial metals that got a boost as we saw rallies in asia on hopes that maybe this new regime in china is going to be spending more helping to prop up the property department there, housing, than might mean more demand for industrial metals. copper today, the standout in part because of that. also, a different note, the s.e.c. ahead of the holiday delayed a decision on the proposed etf, according to the "wall street journal," the etf would hold twice as much copper in terms of holdings compared to the jpmorgan holding approved on december 14th. >> i think 182,000 physical tons they could take off the market. we'll revisit it later. for a moment, thank you. bob pisani is joining me on the floor of the nyse. the big discussion is about retail and what the figures from mastercard tell us. >> i just want to point out that the dow industrials dropped in the middle of the day. there had been some concern the house leadership which is all coming back n
canal that made our world a smaller place. we supported the marshall plan that helped europe regain its strength. and pioneered the atm, so you can get cash when you want it. it's been our privilege to back ideas like these, and the leaders behind them. so why should our anniversary matter to you? because for 200 years, we've been helping people and their ideas move from ambition to achievement. and the next great idea could be yours. ♪ >> after steve jobs died in 2011, there was an outpouring of gratitude from his fans for the way his inventions changed their lives. among the most passionate are parents of children with severe forms of autism, especially those who can't speak and appear hopelessly locked inside themselves. those parents often say these kids understand more and know more than they're able to communicate. well, now with the help of the ipad and other tablet computers, some of those parents are finding out they were right. as lesley stahl first reported in october 2011, it turns out that with specially designed applications, or apps, these computers are helping to unloc
the marshall plan that helped europe regain its strength. and pioneered the atm, so you can get cash when you want it. it's been our privilege to back ideas like these, and the leaders behind them. so why should our anniversary matter to you? because for 200 years, we've been helping people and their ideas move from ambition to achievement. and the next great idea could be yours. ♪ >> the cancer that eventually killed steve jobs was discovered accidentally. while he was being checked for kidney stones back in 2004, a cat scan showed a shadow on his pancreas that turned out to be a malignant tumor. but as jobs' biographer walter isaacson told us, the initial prognosis was a positive one. >> they do a biopsy, and they're very emotional. they say, "this is good. it's one of these very slow-growing, 5% of pancreatic cancers that can actually be cured." but steve jobs doesn't get operated on right away. he tries to treat it with diet. he goes to a spiritualist. he goes to various ways of doing it macrobiotically, and he doesn't get an operation. >> why doesn't he get it operated on immediately?
than five had gone to elementary school in the united states. they came from china, europe, israel. we are not doing a good job in the states in making science and technology a profitable activity, where kids can commit their entire lives and careers to it. the best thing we can do is to invest in science and technology and mathematics education in our elementary and high schools. about the role of private enterprise in solving the problems. i believe that no import technology ever becomes broadly used unless it is commercialized and is an innovation that people want to use. there are smart people like the one building a private space company or another founder who has a fund in silicon valley. smart people who are trying to use private enterprise to solve big problems. i did not discount that. government and academia has its role. one has talked a lot about going to mars. he hopes to die on mars as a first human columnisonist. we had to build 30 saturn-5 rockets, each exerting 7 million pounds of thrust. n out ofhasn't gotte low-earth orbit. going to mars is like building the pyramids
worldwide implications. europe already is on the verge of trouble. to have the united states go off the edge would be catastrophic, for the world, for the global economy. kelly: juan, i was talking to a very good friend of mind who lives here in the united states. he is of course living here, came from paris, france. his friends overseas are saying what is going on with the united states? these guys are actually saying, why can't the united states get this together because so many people throughout the world depend on us. look, our white house chief correspondent ed henry reports the president is rushing back to washington late tonight to get this deal done but is there enough christmas spirit and cheer on capitol hill that there can be goodwill expressed towards republicans and democrats to work in harm any to harmony to find something amenable to everybody? >> i think public opinion out there, public opinion clearly is not favorable to republicans at this moment about the fiscal cliff and the markets out there again could be very, very harsh if there is no deal. so i don't know about chris
for nonfiction are anne applebaum, "iron curtain: the crushing of eastern europe, 1845-1856" published by doubleday. and katherine boo, behind the beautiful forevers. [applause] life, death and hope in a mumbai undercity, published by random house. and robert a. caro, the passage of power, the years of lyndon johnson, volume 4, published by alfred a.k november, and domingo martinez, the boy kings of texas, published by alliance press. and finally, the late anthony shadid, house of stone: a memoir of home, family and a lost middle east published by haughton mifflin harcourt. [applause] the winner of the 2012 national book award for nonfiction describes a world that couldn't be any more different from the world that we're enjoying here tonight. and yet it's a world with that our world depends entirely upon. the subject of this book have been patron hissized -- patronized and romanticized and eagerly ignored in previous work. in this book they appear in all of their complexity. the villains and the sometimes villains along with the sometimes heroes. the earth nothing mying behind this boo
christmas crib in all of europe. it's 52 feet high and contains more than 200 figures. the largest figure being st. joseph standing nearly 6 feet tall and santa was probably enjoying the cooler than normal temperatures in australia. temperatures were in the low 70s. much cooler than normal there, however a few souls braving the less the tropical temperatures even sporting some santa hats, you see all the wind right there but these guys don't seem to mind too much. the holiday spirit being felt across the globe tonight. >> coming up, i'll take you on a sobering tour and talk to one of the residents in the next edition of people behaving badly >>> there's a housing related tax cut that has homeowners attention. it is just day assistsway from expiring. it was established in 2007 in the middle of the foreclosure crisis. if congress doesn't extend it by the end of the year homeowners will have to start paying income taxes on the portion of their mortgage that is forgiven in a foreclosure short sale. >> netflix streaming service is back up and running after being knocked out for most of the day
's boxing today, so there's holidays throughout europe. continue to buy dips on the euro. leave a tight stop 131.20. look for three times on the upside, around 130, 133. tricky during holiday trading. keep it very simple and go with the trend. >> you know, andy, i'm interested that you've chosen to do that, because it flies in the face of an article written by the journal a couple of days ago in which they were suggesting that the fiscal cliff trade here whenever you get bad news from washington is buy the dollar as a safe haven. you're going the other way here. >> right. well, i think there's going to be some battles. i think most of the market feels you will get forward movement when congress comes back. you're going to get a very watered-down plan to punt this forward. that's something i've been telling clients for about three months. that's my expectation, punt forward, but not going to be very pleasant. >> good to see you, andy. hope you had a good holiday. andy busch with "money in motion." catch currency trading on friday at 5:30 p.m. eastern. if you want more education about currenci
wants to see us see what happened in europe and greece. it does not have to happen here. in conjunction with that, this has to be the best place in the world to do business. economic growth, if we grow our economy, it will help our debt and, of course, more opportunity for everyone. so i hope to work with everyone on this table -- everyone at this table on those issues. worse, always making sure -- of course, always making sure that america is safe. we have many challenges around the world. [applause] >> thank you. >> my number one priority echoes what kelly said. we need to come up with a deal that keep us from the automatic spending cuts that go into effect in january and deal with a saner tax system. we can follow a framework as recommended by the simpson- bowles commission that will allow us to protect benefits but will also make some of the tough choices that kelly was talking about. i think we have to put everything on the table for that kind of a deal. we have to look at revenues. we have to look of the domestic side of the budget. we of the look of the defense -- we have to look
it do? >> that, that what would happen is, we were turn into europe. we all see it. we see greece, and spain and italy, and france. they all grow slow of the they have extremely high unemployment rates. we would have a slow economy and high unemployment forever if we taxed ourselves like that. gregg: all right. >> this idea that somehow you can't tax the middle class or we won't, it's impossible. if we keep --. gregg: that is a bad idea, right, i get it. i get it. vat. that i get. >> value-added tax is the worst thing. gregg: brian, what is the solution? >> yeah. i, well, if i were king for a day and told to make the economy grow faster, i would cut the size of our federal government. we need to cut spending everywhere because, the best our economy has done in the last 30 years is during the '80s and '90s. that's when ronald reagan and bill clinton cut spending. i would take the clinton tax rates, right now, i would take them. gregg: really. >> they won't hurt the economy, if, i got clinton's spending. he spent one-third less on federal government than barack obama is today, one-t
200 years. and there's countries, such as western europe, where you don't, we don't have to have what we have and yet you go to other places, and i've been shocked in some of the countries i've been in that are not country from the to the united states singh a minimal amount of marine presence that we have had there. and then, of course, we all learned, i think, at least i did for the first time, or i guess i heard it, it didn't stick previously, that the marines are there to guard the documents. that's shocking. their first obligation to be to protect americans that are serving in that embassy. i'm hoping that's going to change. i'm sure it will change. and it would seem to me the rules of engagement really need to be reviewed. i look at those people streaming through the front gates in benghazi. that would have taken that much to stop that attack if indeed they would have responded to it immediately, it seems to me. again, you are looking at film and understand it's a lot more sterile than actually being there on the ground at the time, but when armed people are coming to the front
america because nobody wants to see us see what happened in europe and greece. it does not have to happen here. in conjunction with that, this has to be the best place in the world to do business. economic growth, if we grow our economy, it will help our debt and, of course, more opportunity for everyone. so i hope to work with everyone on this table -- everyone at this table on those issues. worse, always making sure -- of course, always making sure that america is safe. [applause] >> thank you. >> my number one priority echoes what kelly said. we need to come up with a deal that keep us from the automatic spending cuts that go into effect in january and deal with a senior tax system -- a saner tax system. we can follow a framework as recommended by the simpson- bowles commission that will allow us to protect benefits but will also make some of the tough choices that kelly was talking about. i think we have to put everything on the table for that kind of a deal. we have to look at revenues. we have to look of the domestic side of the budget. we of the look of the defense side. and we hav
. >> there's been a longstanding shift in north america and europe toward para militarize policing using helicopter-style systems, using infrared sensors, using really, really heavy militarized weaponry. that has been longstanding fuelled by the war on drugs and other sort of explicit campaigns. more recently, there has been a big push since the end of the cold war by the big defense and security and i.t. companies to sell things like video surveillance systems, things like geographic mapping systems, and even more recently, drone systems that are being used in the assassination raids in afghanistan and pakistan and elsewhere. >> that is stephen graham, author of, "cities under siege: the new military urbanism." your final comment? expressing weaponization in the way we live. policing is one of the most obvious and current examples in that. i would suggest the pervasive development of john technology around the world that we are saying are being used for all sorts of purposes is really the thin edge of the wedge when it comes to these issues. we're going to see greater and greater weapon
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